What the Loss of a Child Does to Parents, Psychologically and Biologically

Updated: Aug 10, 2021

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Written By Joshua A. Krisch


The loss of a child may be the worst trauma a human being can experience. Though it’s not a terribly common experience in the United States — about 10,000 children between the ages of 1 and 14 died in 2018 — the horrific potential for childhood mortality looms large. While reassuring, the numbers also make plain why losing a child is so feared, so painful, and so stigmatized.


“The death of a child is considered the single worst stressor a person can go through,” says Deborah Carr, chair of the sociology department at Boston University. “Parents and fathers specifically feel responsible for the child’s well-being. So when they lose a child, they’re not just losing a person they loved. They’re also losing the years of promise they had looked forward to.”


For more on this article go to https://www.fatherly.com/health-science/how-parents-experience-the-death-of-a-child/




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